Model #DDG9280DBLWH, this dryer had started making noise during the cycle recently, but it was at least tolerable with the door to the laundry room closed. As the weeks went on, the noise became much more frequent and progressively louder. The temporary solution was to start the dryer then leave the house, not recommended, but eventually the desire for a quiet dryer overcame the fear of calling for service.

Noise calls can sometimes be a little troublesome because the noises don’t always present themselves all the time, and inevitably never in front of the service tech. But my advice has always been the same when seeking the source of a noise and that is to engage your ears and get them listening to the problem.

Because the noise on this dryer was consistent and definitely coming from the rear of the unit, it didn’t take much for me to determine the rear bearing was going to need replacing. The drum on this and many other GE dryers use a bearing attached to the center of the drum which then slips into a matching receptacle on the rear bulkhead. These bearings provide support for the rear of the drum along with creating an axis for rotational purposes. As they age and are subjected to heat and lint buildup, eventually they will begin to make noise. If not attended to, they eventually will fail completely and make a lot of noise in the process.

With the front panel removed along with the drum, I was able to get to the old bearing to remove it. These old ones are locked to the receiver by an ‘e’ clip, which isn’t on the new style by the way, so it is necessary to get to the back for removal. After the lint and greasy mess was cleaned, I installed the parts from the new bearing kit, then reversed the process putting everything back together. A press of the start button had the dryer humming along quite as before.